Coronavirus Disease 2019 (“COVID-19”) Pandemic  

COVID-19 is a respiratory illness caused by a novel (new) coronavirus designated SARS-CoV-2 that spreads person to person. COVID-19 was first identified in December 2019 in the Far East. It has since spread rapidly to countries worldwide, including the United States. This situation poses a serious public health risk. West Virginians at the state, private sector, community, and family level are working to reduce COVID-19’s effect on both our state’s health and its economy.

 

COVID-19 can cause mild to severe illness. Some people have little to no symptoms; many have mild disease, but can spread it to others. Severe illness typically, though not always, occurs in older adults or in those with chronic diseases. Social distancing and other community mitigation measures are one of our most powerful tools to reduce spread and protect each other, our families, and our communities.

 

This is a rapidly evolving situation, so information and recommendations may change. It is important to stay up to date with the most current information.

COVID-19 Daily Update 11-26-2020

 

11/26/2020

 

The West Virginia Department of Health and Human Resources (DHHR) reports as of 10:00 a.m., November 26, 2020, there have been 1,079,066 total confirmatory laboratory results received for COVID-19, with 44,180 total cases and 712 deaths.

 

DHHR has confirmed the deaths of a 79-year old male from Berkeley County, a 50-year old male from Mason County, an 89-year old female from Jefferson County, a 69-year old male from Cabell County, an 86-year old female from Kanawha County, a 74-year old female from Putnam County, a 75-year old male from Taylor County, an 85-year old female from Marshall County, a 57-year old male from Raleigh County, an 81-year old female from Mineral County, a 47-year old female from Wyoming County, a 70-year old male from Marshall County, a 98-year old male from Cabell County, a 69-year old male from Preston County, a 57-year old male from Jackson County, an 85-year old female from Cabell County, and a 68-year old male from Doddridge County.

 

 

“During the holiday season, we feel the loss of loved ones with a deeper pain,” said Bill J. Crouch, DHHR Cabinet Secretary. “Each person lost to this virus is loved and remembered, not only today, but every day.”

 

 

CASES PER COUNTY: Barbour (384), Berkeley (2,945), Boone (619), Braxton (108), Brooke (596), Cabell (2,756), Calhoun (69), Clay (106), Doddridge (117), Fayette (1,094), Gilmer (199), Grant (320), Greenbrier (432), Hampshire (299), Hancock (620), Hardy (240), Harrison (1,259), Jackson (684), Jefferson (1,263), Kanawha (5,480), Lewis (238), Lincoln (407), Logan (1,028), Marion (810), Marshall (1,104), Mason (403), McDowell (602), Mercer (1,286), Mineral (1,131), Mingo (966), Monongalia (3,202), Monroe (360), Morgan (252), Nicholas (322), Ohio (1,438), Pendleton (102), Pleasants (86), Pocahontas (152), Preston (541), Putnam (1,830), Raleigh (1,492), Randolph (677), Ritchie (145), Roane (162), Summers (265), Taylor (311), Tucker (126), Tyler (134), Upshur (471), Wayne (961), Webster (61), Wetzel (390), Wirt (95), Wood (2,361), Wyoming (679).

 

Please note that delays may be experienced with the reporting of information from the local health department to DHHR. As case surveillance continues at the local health department level, it may reveal that those tested in a certain county may not be a resident of that county, or even the state as an individual in question may have crossed the state border to be tested. Such is the case of Clay County in this report.